Three things you are doing wrong when training your developers

[Welcome to our guest blogger Cal Evans]

It’s great that you understand that training your developers is important. Many managers get that and start down the road with the goal of increasing knowledge and productivity.

However, some programs are more successful than others. If your program isn’t as successful as you might like, consider these three problems that managers often run into when developing and executing a developer training program.

3. Not including everyone

Your training should include all your developers. Training is not a perk to be handed out to senior developers or those who have done something extraordinary. Training is important for every developer. Don’t play favorites with your training, send every developer you can, as often as you can.

2. Irrelevant topics

These days, all employees are being bombarded by mandatory training in areas that someone felt was important but may not have a direct, positive impact on their ability to do their job. Make sure that in addition to the mandatory training, that each of your developers qualify for job/career relevant training at least once a year.

1. Not training regularly

The biggest problem managers run into when training their developers is that the training becomes a one-off, as-needed, or worse yet, as-the-developer-asks. Your training needs to be regular and ongoing. This means that you need to budget for big training each and every year. Additionally, you need to budget for conferences. Finally, you need to plan for a lunch-and-learn program. The backbone of a solid training program is a monthly or every-other-week lunch-and-learn program.

If you can avoid these three problems, you can build a solid training program for your developers. If you aren’t sure where to start, contact Zend training and let them help you design a plan to get your developer team up to current on programming techniques and best practices.

 

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    [GUEST BLOGGER] For the past 13 years Cal has worked with PHP and MySQL on Linux, OSX, and Windows. He has built a variety of projects ranging in size from simple web pages to multi-million dollar web applications. When not banging his head on his monitor, attempting a blood sacrifice to get a particular piece of code working, he enjoys building and managing development teams using his widely imitated but never patented management style of “management by wandering around”. These days, when not working with PHP, Cal can be found working on a variety of projects like [Nomad PHP](https://nomadphp.com). He speaks at conferences around the world on topics ranging from technical talks to motivational talks for developers.

    About Cal Evans

    [GUEST BLOGGER] For the past 13 years Cal has worked with PHP and MySQL on Linux, OSX, and Windows. He has built a variety of projects ranging in size from simple web pages to multi-million dollar web applications. When not banging his head on his monitor, attempting a blood sacrifice to get a particular piece of code working, he enjoys building and managing development teams using his widely imitated but never patented management style of “management by wandering around”. These days, when not working with PHP, Cal can be found working on a variety of projects like [Nomad PHP](https://nomadphp.com). He speaks at conferences around the world on topics ranging from technical talks to motivational talks for developers.